Uses of products

Adzuki bean

adzukibean

Adzuki bean is a small red-brown bean frequently used in Japanese desserts. Like other legumes, the adzuki bean is a nutritional powerhouse, rich in protein, fiber and folic acid. The name adzuki comes from the Japanese language, although the pronunciation often sounds like “azuki”. These beans are primarily red in color, but white, black, and mottled cultivars can also be found in certain areas. The scientific name of this bean is Vigna angularis, and they grow annually.

Nutritional Value: Adzuki beans are a nutrient-dense food, providing a hefty amount of nutrients compared to their caloric content. They are a good food source of potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, manganese, and zinc. They also contain B-vitamins, including B6, B2, B1, B3, and folic acid.

Health Benefits:

  1. Adzuki beans are high in dietary fiber that helps to eliminate constipation, diarrhea, and bloating, as well as more serious conditions like colon cancer.
  2. The dietary fiber in adzuki beans has a second purpose, regulating the activity of insulin receptors in the body to ensure that blood sugar levels remain normal. This can help prevent the onset of diabetes.
  3. Folate, potassium, magnesium, and dietary fiber all combine into a powerful cardiovascular boost in adzuki beans. This can help lower your chances of developing atherosclerosis, which means protecting you from heart attacks and strokes.
  4. Foods like adzuki beans can also provide us with an energetic boost and help in growth or repair due to that high protein content.
  5. Helps in weight loss program.
  6. Adzuki beans contain a unique mineral known as molybdenum in quite high concentrations, it plays a crucial part in the detoxification of the liver.
  7. The high content of B vitamins, particularly folic acid, can prevent the development of birth defects in unborn babies.
  8. Adzuki beans also contain these important minerals to keep you feeling young and help in bone strength.

Uses: Add to any favorite stew .Make a bean salad with diced veggies and your favorite salad dressing, etc.

The black-eyed pea

blackeyedpea

The black-eyed pea or black-eyed bean, a legume, is a subspecies of the cowpea, grown around the world for its medium-sized, edible bean.Black-eyed peas are actually a bean and are part of the vegetable group on the Food Guide Pyramid. They are available dried, frozen and canned and offer several health benefits when included in a well-balanced diet.

Nutritional Value: Black-eyed peas contain calcium (41 mg) folate (356 mcg), protein (13.22 g), fiber (11.1 g) and vitamin A (26 IU), among other nutrients, all for less than 200 Calories, in a 171-g, one-cup serving.[3]

Health Benefits:

(1) One of the main health benefits of black-eyed peas is their high fiber content. Fiber is a nutrient that helps regulate your digestive system, and increasing your intake could help alleviate constipation and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Fiber also helps keep your cholesterol levels healthy by preventing cholesterol from being absorbed into your bloodstream which reduces your risk of developing heart disease. Additionally, high-fiber foods keep you feeling full, since they are digested slowly — which is important for weight control.

(2) Potassium is a nutrient that helps keep your blood pressure levels at healthy numbers, which lowers your risk of heart disease. Getting adequate potassium in your diet from black-eyed peas also supports the health of your muscles and bones.

(3) Black-eyed peas are a low-fat and low-calorie food, making them a healthy addition to a weight-loss meal plan. A diet that is low in fat and calories helps you lose weight, prevents weight gain and protects you from many health conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and depression.

(4) Black-eyed peas are a good alternative source of protein if you don’t eat meat. Protein is important because it supports most of the parts of your body, including muscles, skin, hair and nails. In addition, protein helps cells grow and repair and provides energy to your body.

Uses: They make a good addition to soups, stews and salads and are also a healthy side dish.

Black lentil bean

blacklentil

Black lentil bean another variety of lentil (Lens culinaris) which is an edible pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, known for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each.

Nutritional Value:  One cup of cooked lentils contains 230 calories, 18 grams of protein, 1 gram of fat, and 40 grams of carbohydrates (including 16 grams of fiber and 4 grams of sugar).That same 1 cup serving provides 90% of your daily folate needs, 37% of iron, 49% of manganese, 36% of phosphorus, 22% of thiamin, 21% of potassium and 18% of vitamin B6.Lentils also provide riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.

Health Benefits:

  1. By consuming it, the risk for heart disease is further decreased.
  2. The potassium, calcium and magnesium in lentils have been found to decrease blood pressure naturally.
  3. The fiber in lentils is also associated with a lowered risk of colorectal cancer.
  4. Folate in lentils is critical for the prevention of birth defects and has been shown to cut the chances of early delivery by 50% or more if consumed for at least a year before pregnancy.
  5. Lentils are a great non-heme source of iron and contain over 1/3 of your daily iron needs to help fighting fatigue in one cup (cooked).
  6. The high fiber in lentils also helps to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy digestive tract.

Uses: Unlike dried beans, lentils do not require soaking. Rinse away any dirt from the lentils and discard any damaged lentils or foreign material. Place the lentils into a pot and add 2 cups of water for every cup of lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer to desired tenderness, typically about 15 to 20 minutes. One cup of dried lentils will yield 2-2 ½ cups of cooked lentils. Black lentils, also known as beluga lentils for their resemblance to caviar when cooked.

Brown lentil bean

brownlentil

Brown lentil bean another variety of lentil (Lens culinaris) which is an edible pulse. It is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, known for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each.

Nutritional Value:  One cup of cooked lentils contains 230 calories, 18 grams of protein, 1 gram of fat, and 40 grams of carbohydrates (including 16 grams of fiber and 4 grams of sugar).That same 1 cup serving provides 90% of your daily folate needs, 37% of iron, 49% of manganese, 36% of phosphorus, 22% of thiamin, 21% of potassium and 18% of vitamin B6. Lentils also provide riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.

Health Benefits:

  1. By consuming it, the risk for heart disease is further decreased.
  2. The potassium, calcium and magnesium in lentils have been found to decrease blood pressure naturally.
  3. The fiber in lentils is also associated with a lowered risk of colorectal cancer.
  4. Folate in lentils is critical for the prevention of birth defects and has been shown to cut the chances of early delivery by 50% or more if consumed for at least a year before pregnancy.

5.Lentils are a great non-heme source of iron and contain over 1/3 of your daily iron needs to  help fighting fatigue in one cup (cooked).

 6.The high fiber in lentils also helps to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a  healthy digestive tract.

Uses: Unlike dried beans, lentils do not require soaking. Rinse away any dirt from the lentils and discard any damaged lentils or foreign material. Place the lentils into a pot and add 2 cups of water for every cup of lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer to desired tenderness, typically about 15 to 20 minutes. One cup of dried lentils will yield 2-2 ½ cups of cooked lentils. Brown lentils are the least expensive and soften the most upon cooking. They are best used in soups in stews.

Fava bean

fava

Fava bean. The Greek word fáva (φάβα) does not refer to broad beans, but to the yellow split pea and also to the legume Lathyrus sativus. Broad beans are known instead as koukiá (Greek: κουκιά), and are eaten in a stew combined with artichokes, while they are still fresh in their pods.

Nutritional Value:  per 100 g (3.5 oz): Energy 1,425 kJ (341 kcal), Carbohydrates 60 g, Sugars 8 g, Dietary fiber        26 g, Fat 1 g, Protein 25 g, Vitamins: Thiamine (B1) (61%) 0.7 mg, antothenic acid (B5) (34%) 1.7 mg, Folate (B9) (69%) 274 μg, Minerals: Iron (31%) 4 mg.

Health Benefits:

  1. Lowers Cholesterol Levels. The fiber from split peas forms a gel-like substance in the digestive tract. So, it binds the cholesterol-containing bile and carries it out of the body.
  2. Reduce Cancer Risk. Split peas contain isoflavones (particularly Daidzein) that decrease the risk of developing certain types of cancers, especially breast cancer and prostate cancer.
  3. Apart from lowering cholesterol levels, the high fiber content of split peas helps regulate blood sugar levels.
  4. Split peas are packed with trace mineral called molybdenum which helps in the detoxification of sulfites.
  5. Split peas are good for your heart as they help reduce plaque in your blood vessels and hence prevent cardiovascular disease.
  6. Being rich in fiber and protein, split pea can help you a great deal in your weight loss efforts. Even a small portion of this food is filling as it makes you feel fuller for longer.
  7. Split peas are helpful in dealing with digestive disorders such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome and diverticulosis because of their high soluble fiber content.

Uses: In Europe, the Greek “Fava” is a dish made with yellow split peas pureed to create an appetizer or meze.

Lima bean

limabean

Lima bean or phaseolus limensis is a legume, as are split peas and lentils. Until recently, it was thought they originated in Brazil, but new discoveries have pinpointed Guatemala. References to lima beans began showing up in ancient literature in the 1500s.

Nutritional Value: Lima beans contain 39% of the daily food value for folate, for DNA synthesis and cell division. They also contain 20% of the daily value of thiamin (vitamin B1), and 15% of vitamin B6. Other nutrients include pantothenic acid, riboflavin, and niacin, most of which function as co-enzymes to metabolize carbohydrates, protein, and fats in your system.

The fiber in lima beans provides 53% of your body’s daily requirement – important not only as 1) a laxative but 2) to protect the colon and fight cancer by decreasing the amount of time toxic substances stay in the colon, and 3) reduces blood cholesterol levels by decreasing re-absorption in the colon. The mineral content in lima beans provides almost half of what you need per day in manganese, along with plentiful amounts of iron, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and valuable antioxidants.

Health Benefits:  

  1. Lima beans, can help diabetes patients lower their insulin intake. One study in particular determined that the slow digestive process makes them low on the glycemic index, which helps stabilize blood glucose levels, that that eating more beans will help reduce the total glycemic value of meals.
  2. A study published in 2012 reported that the high amounts of folic acid, or folate, in lima beans may reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer, and increase the odds of survival, increasing as much as 58% for those ingesting healthy amounts before a breast cancer diagnosis. In trials, the highest intakes were linked with a 58% improved breast cancer survival rate.

Uses: Dried lima beans require soaking for at least six hours. After draining, they can be steamed or boiled for about 20 minutes, just like fresh or frozen types, with salt and pepper added for flavor. A little butter only increases that aspect of the flavor – it explains why in some areas of the country they’re called butter beans. Canned lima beans should be drained and rinsed before preparation. In any case, lima beans mix well with vegetables for casseroles, soups, and even cold in salads.

Mung bean 

mungbean

Mung bean  or Vigna radiate — a type of small, green legume in the same plant family as peas and lentils — is a high source of protein, fiber, antioxidants and phytonutrients. They’ve been a part of traditional Ayurvedic diets in India for thousands of years. Mung beans are considered  “one of the most cherished foods” in the ancient Indian practice that’s been a traditional form of medicine since roughly 1,500 B.C.

Nutritional Value: One cup of cooked mung beans contains the following (percentages based on the RDAs for the average adult female): 212 calories, 14 grams of protein, 15 grams of fiber, 1 gram of fat, 4 grams of sugar, 321 micrograms of folate (100%),97 milligrams of magnesium (36%), 0.33 milligrams of vitamin b1 thiamine (36%), 0.6 milligrams of manganese (33%), 7 milligrams of zinc (24%), 0.8 milligrams of vitamin B5 pantothenic acid (8%), 0.13 milligrams of vitamin B6 (11%), 55 milligrams of calcium (5%). If you choose to sprout mung beans and eat them raw, each cup will only have about 31 calories and will provide about three grams of protein and two grams of fiber.

Health Benefits:

  1. Can Help Lower High Cholesterol Levels and Protect Against Heart Disease
  2. Helps Lower High Blood Pressure
  3. Contains Antioxidants That Fight Cancer Development
  4. Can Help Prevent or Treat Type 2 Diabetes
  5. Provide a High Source of Protein
  6. Boosts Immunity and Protects Against Infections and Viruses
  7. High Source of Vitamins and Minerals, Like Folate and Magnesium
  8. Fights Obesity and Helps with Weight Loss
  9. Can Help Decrease PMS Symptoms
  10. Easy to Digest Compared to Many Other Beans

Uses: Sprouting, or germination, is thought to improve the nutritional and medicinal qualities of mung beans nutrition — making them easier to digest and tolerate — so always try to consume sprouted mung beans if you can.

Pea bean

peabean

Pea bean is a variety of edible common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) that has been recorded in Britain since the 16th century. Also known as the navy bean, fagioli or pea bean, the white pea is a classic choice for baked beans or soups. The small- to medium-sized white legumes became known as “navy beans” after sailors stationed overseas,

Nutritional Value:  Navy beans top the list of fiber-rich legumes, offering 19 g of fiber per cup, which is about half of the daily recommended amount of fiber, notes the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. The beans are also a good source of protein, at 16 g per cup. The white pea also provides at least a quarter of the daily recommended amounts of thiamin, folic acid, iron, copper, potassium, phosphorus, manganese and magnesium. A 1-cup serving of beans contains 255 calories and 1.1 g fat.

Health Benefits: Packing an iron punch, white peas come to the rescue for people at risk for iron deficiencies, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Young children, pregnant women, women with heavy menstrual cycles and people who suffer heavy blood loss from injury or disease are all at risk of developing an iron deficiency, which causes fatigue and weakness. Paired with grains to round out the amino acid content, navy beans provide a complete protein that is less expensive and lower in fat than many animal-based products. In fact, legumes such as the white pea are useful to vegetarians and vegans looking for nonanimal protein sources. Finally, the fiber rich-white pea is a weight loss boon because it promotes proper digestion and makes you feel full more quickly than many other foods, yet it is low in calories and saturated fat. The high-fiber content is also helpful for people watching their cholesterol levels.

Uses: Add white peas to chili or use for baked beans. Pair either dish with corn bread to make a complete protein serving. Other bean and grain suggestions including spreading white peas pureed with olive oil and garlic on whole-wheat pita bread, using white peas and noodles in a minestrone-like soup, tossing white peas into a chilled pasta salad or topping rice or other grains with white peas and cooked vegetables.

Pinto bean

pintobean

Pinto bean is a variety of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). It is the most popular bean in the United States[1] and northwestern Mexico, and is most often eaten whole in broth or mashed and refried. Either whole or mashed, In Spanish, they are called frijol pinto, literally “speckled bean”, and in South America it is known as the poroto frutilla, literally “strawberry bean”. In Portuguese, they are called feijão carioca in Brazil (literally “carioca bean”) and feijão catarino in Portugal.

Nutritional Value: per 100 g: Energy 598 kJ (143 kcal), Carbohydrates 26.22, Sugars 0.34, Dietary fiber 9.0, Fat 0.65, Saturated  0.109, Monounsaturated 0.106, Polyunsaturated 0.188, Protein 9.01, Thiamine (B1) (17%) 0.193 mg, Riboflavin (B2) (5%) 0.062 mg, Niacin (B3) (2%) 0.318 mg, Vitamin B6 (18%) 0.229 mg, Folate (B9)(43%)  172 μg, Vitamin C (1%) 0.8 mg, Vitamin E(6%) 0.94 mg, Vitamin K (3%) 3.5 μg, Calcium (5%) 46 mg,Iron (16%) 2.09 mg, Magnesium (14%)50 mg, Phosphorus (21%) 147 mg, Potassium (9%) 436 mg, Sodium (16%)238 mg, Zinc (10%) 0.98 mg, Other constituents:Water  62.95 g

Health Benefits:

  1. Pinto beans are full of insoluble fibers. This can help in avoiding constipation.
  2. Pinto beans are wonderful options for natural fiber, that lead to lowering cholesterol levels within the blood.
  3. It will not only help in stabilizing the blood sugar levels but additionally offers constant energy towards the body.
  4. Pinto beans are full of Vitamin B which could prevent numerous dry skin difficulties just like redness, irritation, pigmentation, scaliness and dermatitis.
  5. Help you detoxify your body and fat free.
  6. Help improve your nervous system and great Antioxidant properties.
  7. Helpful for pregnant women and their babies.
  8. Help you maintain a healthy blood pressure, blood formation, prevents certain types of cancer and alleviates sulfite sensitivity.

Uses: The pinto bean is the bean most commonly used for refried beans (fresh or canned) and in many dishes. This variety is often used in chili con carne, although kidney beans, black beans, and many others may also be used in other locales.

Red lentil bean

redlentil

Red lentil bean another variety of lentil (Lens culinaris) which is an edible pulse. It is a bushymannual plant of the legume family, known for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 40 cm (16 in)tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each.

Nutritional Value:  One cup of cooked lentils contains 230 calories, 18 grams of protein, 1 gram of fat, and 40 grams of carbohydrates (including 16 grams of fiber and 4 grams of sugar).That same 1 cup serving provides 90% of your daily folate needs, 37% of iron, 49% of manganese, 36% of phosphorus, 22% of thiamin, 21% of potassium and 18% of vitamin B6. Lentils also provide riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.

Health Benefits:

  1. By consuming it, the risk for heart disease is further decreased.
  2. The potassium, calcium and magnesium in lentils have been found to decrease blood pressure naturally.
  3. The fiber in lentils is also associated with a lowered risk of colorectal cancer.
  4. Folate in lentils is critical for the prevention of birth defects and has been shown to cut the

   chances of early delivery by 50% or more if consumed for at least a year before pregnancy.

  1. Lentils are a great non-heme source of iron and contain over 1/3 of your daily iron needs to help fighting fatigue in one cup (cooked).
  2. The high fiber in lentils also helps to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy digestive tract.

Uses: Unlike dried beans, lentils do not require soaking. Rinse away any dirt from the lentils and discard any damaged lentils or foreign material. Place the lentils into a pot and add 2 cups of water for every cup of lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer to desired tenderness, typically about 15 to 20 minutes. One cup of dried lentils will yield 2-2 ½ cups of cooked lentils. Red lentils have a more mild taste and cook the fastest. They are typically used in Indian dals and purees.